Now more than ever — in this time of ecological and social overshoot — corporate citizenship is on the rise. Organizations no longer embrace sustainability simply to cater to consumers; they are integrating it into operations to improve products and long-term viability. And as the workforce moves away from siloed corporate social responsibility departments, more people are identifying as sustainability professionals. 

Coming together for change

The International Society of Sustainability Professionals (ISSP), the world's leading association of sustainability professionals, recognizes anyone who spends 25 percent or more of their time helping to make the world more resilient as a sustainability professional, regardless of the type of business a person works for or the title they hold. The association understands that it’s difficult for many to see the great changes happening at state and local levels, as well as in the private sector, and encourages people to be part of the global group working on the frontlines.

This exchange of knowledge happens among ISSP credential holders and members, and more importantly, across industries. The power of association is real. When people surround themselves with like-minded and intellectually curious peers, and share experiences, objectives are more likely to be achieved.

A positive transition

From improving the sustainability of products we use in everyday life, to continually enhancing their company’s environmental and social performance, members of the ISSP are leading the world in a positive transition. Notable leaders include Manuel Ceja, an ISSP-certified sustainability professional, who is the family care sustainability leader at Procter and Gamble, as well as Shannon Tolliver, an ISSP sustainability associate, who is the social responsibility and environmental sustainability manager of White Castle. I myself am personally focused on the movement forward, as I provide responsibly-sourced high-quality food in my position at HelloFresh.

ISSP’s Hall of Fame has recognized professionals who have made significant contributions to the field. Inductees have included John Elkington, Hazel Henderson, Jeffrey Hollender, Amory and Hunter Lovins, and Joel Makower. However, all levels of management must continue collaborating and recruiting the next generation if we are to invoke true, regenerative change and create a better world for everyone. We are stronger together. The sustainability narrative has changed drastically over the past decade, but much work remains to be done.

Join us at www.SustainabilityProfessionals.org