Today, the world has a historic opportunity to end the AIDS epidemic as a public health threat by 2030. Since 2000, the global response to HIV has averted 30 million new HIV infections and nearly 8 million AIDS-related deaths.

Fifteen years ago, fewer than 700,000 people were receiving antiretroviral medicines, but today more than 15 million people have access. One of the most ambitious treatment goals ever set—to ensure that 15 million people have access to HIV treatment by 2015—has been met and exceeded.

Stepping it up

But AIDS is far from over. Of the 36.9 million people living with HIV, almost half are unaware they are HIV-positive. Think about it: there are 22 million people living with HIV who are not accessing the life-saving treatment they need!

"Reaching the Fast-Track Targets by 2020, we will break the epidemic, so from 2021 there will be less money needed each year to end the epidemic by 2030."

As part of an accelerated response to HIV, UNAIDS is calling for a Fast-Track approach, with a front-loading of investment over the next five years to reach an ambitious 90–90–90 treatment target by 2020. Reaching this target would see 90 percent of people living with HIV knowing their HIV status, 90 percent of people who know their HIV-positive status accessing treatment and 90 percent of people on treatment having suppressed viral loads. The Fast-Track approach will also reduce new HIV infections by 75 percent and would realize our vision of zero discrimination. 

Why now?

Reaching the Fast-Track Targets by 2020, we will break the epidemic, so from 2021 there will be less money needed each year to end the epidemic by 2030. Increasing current investments by $12 billion a year would produce benefits of more than $3.2 trillion that extend well beyond 2030—a return on investment of nearly $17 for every $1 invested.

By following the Fast-Track approach, together we can avert 21 million AIDS-related deaths and 28 million new HIV infections and end the AIDS epidemic by 2030.